Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-2005

Publication Title

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition

Abstract

Variability in talker identity and speaking rate, commonly referred to as indexical variation, has demonstrable effects on the speed and accuracy of spoken word recognition. The present study examines the time course of indexical specificity effects to evaluate the hypothesis that such effects occur relatively late in the perceptual processing of spoken words. In 3 long-term repetition priming experiments, the authors examined reaction times to targets that were primed by stimuli that matched or mismatched on the indexical variable of interest (either talker identity or speaking rate). Each experiment was designed to manipulate the speed with which participants processed the stimuli. The results demonstrate that indexical variability affects participants’ perception of spoken words only when processing is relatively slow and effortful.

DOI

10.1037/0278-7393.31.2.306

Version

Postprint

Volume

31

Issue

2