Abstract

In this 2005 interview, Dargan Burns, an African-American discusses his involvement in integration efforts in Cleveland from the 1950s to the present. Burns, born in South Carolina, fought in the Army in World War II, and was educated at the Hampton Institute and Boston University. At BU, he met and became a friend of Martin Luther King, Jr.. He was also a friend of J. Harold Brown, who was very active in Karamu House. In 1954, Burns joined the then white elitist Church of the Covenant as one of its first African-American members. Thereafter, he became active in the Church's affairs as well as in other efforts to integrate schools and other institutions in the University Circle area of Cleveland. In the interview, he also talks about some of the activist pastors of the Church of the Covenant in the Civil Rights era.

Creator

Burns, Dargan (interviewee)

Creator

Kaczmarski, Lindsey (interviewer)

Project

History 400

Date

11-18-2005

Document Type

Oral History

Duration

63 minutes

Comments

poor sound quality

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 License.

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