Date of Award

Spring 5-12-2021

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy in Urban Education

Department

Doctoral Studies

First Advisor

Phillips, Julia

Second Advisor

Voight, Adam

Third Advisor

Snyder, Jeffrey

Subject Headings

Counseling Psychology, Psychology

Abstract

Internalized racism, also referred to as appropriated racial oppression, refers to the phenomenon of people of color adopting negative racist messages about their worth and abilities. The internalization of racism by members of the targeted group results in an experience of self-degradation and self-alienation and the assumption of one’s inferiority, which is directly related to issues of self-esteem, self-confidence, shame, depression, and anxiety. This study used structural regression with moderation and mediation to explore the possibility of internalized racism as a mediating variable and black identity and perceived social support as possible moderators. A sample of 639 participants (MAge = 35.29, SDAge = 10.09) who identified as Black and/or African American were included in the study. The findings indicated that internalized racism partially mediated the relationship between racial microaggressions and depression and anxiety, where approximately 50 percent of the relationships were explained by internalized racism. Additionally, the findings indicated that centrality and private regard aspects of Black identity weakened the relationship between racial microaggressions and depression and anxiety. Finally, the findings indicated that social support weakens the relationship between racial microaggressions and depression and anxiety.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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