Event Title

How Open Access is Changing Scholarship

Author Biography

Director of Scholarly Communications Office, Robert Woodruff Library, Emory University

Lisa A. Macklin joined Emory University in 2005 and was appointed the first Director, Scholarly Communications Office (formerly the Libraries Intellectual Property Rights Office) in 2007. In this role she works with faculty, students, and staff on the application of copyright law to teaching, research, and publishing (see Emory Scholarly Communications for more information). Her interests include transformations in scholarship and publishing, including new models of scholarship in digital form and the Open Access movement.

Program Type

Event

Start Date and Time

22-10-2014 9:30 AM

End Date and Time

22-10-2014 10:45 AM

Location

Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Moot Courtroom

Program Description

The current system of scholarly publication, communication and evaluation is evolving in significant ways. We will explore how the traditional system of scholarly publication serves faculty and students poorly, and ways in which the Open Access movement is providing new opportunities to expand the reach of scholarship, build faculty reputations, and provide new metrics of evaluation. Distributing your work as open access need not be difficult or time consuming, and your library can help. Join us for a discussion of how you can benefit from participating in the Open Access movement.

Link to Webinar

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COinS Lisa A. Macklin
 
Oct 22nd, 9:30 AM Oct 22nd, 10:45 AM

How Open Access is Changing Scholarship

Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Moot Courtroom

The current system of scholarly publication, communication and evaluation is evolving in significant ways. We will explore how the traditional system of scholarly publication serves faculty and students poorly, and ways in which the Open Access movement is providing new opportunities to expand the reach of scholarship, build faculty reputations, and provide new metrics of evaluation. Distributing your work as open access need not be difficult or time consuming, and your library can help. Join us for a discussion of how you can benefit from participating in the Open Access movement.