Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-1-2013

Publication Title

American Journal of Surgery

Abstract

Background: There is minimal literature comparing self-inflicted (SI) with non–self-inflicted (NSI) anterior abdominal stab wounds (AASW). Methods: Adult patients treated at a level 1 trauma center from 2006 through 2011 with an AASW were reviewed. Results: There were 215 patients with an AASW; 20% were SI. NSI patients had more nonabdominal injuries (47% vs 16%, P < .01) and disposition directly to the operating room (45% vs 26%, P = .02). Intra-abdominal injury rates were similar. One hundred twenty-eight patients had isolated AASWs; 28% were SI. SI patients had higher admission rates (86% vs 63%, P = .01). One hundred three patients had isolated stable/asymptomatic AASWs; 31% were SI. SI patients had more admissions (84% vs 52%, P < .01), had higher intensive care unit admission rates (23% vs 5%, P = .01), longer LOS (3.2 vs 1.4, P < .01), and higher hospital charges ($18,000 vs $11,000, P < .01). The rates of intra-abdominal injury were again similar. Conclusions: Controlling for extra-abdominal injuries, SI AASW patients have similar rates of intra-abdominal injury but use more resources.

DOI

10.1016/j.amjsurg.2012.10.012

Version

Postprint

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Volume

205

Issue

3

Included in

Mathematics Commons

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